_back



Rebirth of Tragedy (2011)






"The power of music, heard in moments of overwhelming joy, mirrors our cries of horror and nostalgic wrenching which penetrates into something we have irrevocably lost.

نسمع في لحظات الفرح الغامر صرخات الرعب أو البكاء الموجع اشتياقاً إلى شيء ما فقدناه بلا رجعة

In this sense, who we call "the Dionysian man" resembles Hamlet: both have once looked truly into the essence of things and have gained knowledge. But nausea inhibits their action, for their action could not change anything in the eternal nature of things. They feel it to be ridiculous or humiliating that they should be asked to set right a world that is out of joint.

Action requires the veils of illusion: that is the doctrine of Hamlet, not that cheap wisdom of Jack the Dreamer who reflects too much and, as it were, from an excess of possibilities does not get around to action. Not reflection, no--true knowledge, an insight into the horrible truth, outweighs any motive for action, both in Hamlet and in the Dionysian man.

Thus, through music, the Dionysian Man ceases to be an artist; he becomes a work of art. Here all nature’s artistic power reveals itself to him amidst shivers of intoxication, to the highest, most blissful satisfaction of the primordial unity."

released 04 December 2012




Jean Michel
Hoffman



film

theatre

music


selected writing

Jean Michel is a film and theatre director, writer and artist based in New York City.
Read More

@jean__michel___





Mark